Tanai Benard was driving her fifth-grade son Dez to school one morning when she decided to discuss his school’s active shooter drill with him. Tanai wanted to know that her son was prepared for anything that might happen and that he would come home safe and sound in the event of such a tragedy.

Since the last school shooting in Parkland, Florida, the discussion about guns in schools and gun control, in general, has been growing. With it, more people are discussing the fact that kids need to be prepared for such an event, and that it seems scary that it’s something children need to be learning.
Tanai’s son gave her an answer that at first surprised her and set off some mental alarms. However, once he clarified his role in the active shooter drill, Tanai realized that her son was not only brave but possibly growing up too fast. She shared the story on her Facebook, and it has since been shared almost 175,000 times and received over 365,000 likes.

Tanai began by asking her son if his school had been preparing them for an active shooter drill, a difficult conversation for a parent to have with their child.
Facebook/Tanai Benard
Dez’s answer was worrisome for Tanai to say the least. With the idea of an active shooter drill being an opportunity for systemic racism, Tanai was understandably worried.
Facebook/Tanai Benard
Tanai tentatively asked her son why he was picked for such a role. However, she was not expecting the kind of answer that he gave her.
Facebook/Tanai Benard
Dez’s answer was so thoughtful and sad, that Tanai almost broke down from hearing it. It’s strange that children need to think about these things.
Facebook/Tanai Benard
Dez showed his mom that he was willing to be brave and protect the other kids in his class. For being in the fifth grade, Dez showed a remarkable amount of maturity.

In their comments, people commended Dez and credited Tanai with raising such a considerate and brave son. They also shared their own opinions on the matter of school safety.
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Hopefully one day kids won’t have to worry about something horrible happening in the halls of their school. Until that day, it’s a good thing kids like Dez are in this world.
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