10. Interval Training
Interval training workouts help you deal with addiction. These workouts stimulate the hypothalamus (which reduces your cravings) and reprograms the brain to respond to the endorphin rush brought about by exercise. This is great if you want to let go of vices that can harm your body and brain, such as smoking and drug abuse.





9. Aerobics
Aerobic exercises strengthen the verbal memory region of the hippocampus and make it easier for you to remember the right words to use when talking with other people. This means you’ll avoid scenarios where you have to make up words for the terms you can’t remember — which can be embarrassing and make you look unintelligent.
8. Yoga
Yoga doesn’t only help you develop a more flexible body. A study from the University of Illinois showed that students who spent 20 minutes doing yoga poses exhibited quicker and more accurate information processing abilities. Yoga’s stress-busting effects also promote higher emotional intelligence and better mental health.
7. Circuit Training
When you do circuit training, you have no choice but to pay attention to the number of reps you must perform and the moments when you need to switch from one workout to another. These stimulate your cerebellum, parietal lobe, and prefrontal cortex and enhance your brain activity while improving your attention to detail.
6. Weightlifting
Research has shown that strength training stimulates the prefrontal cortex, which helps improve your associative memory (e.g. remembering someone’s name when you see their face). It also enhances your focus and attention span and makes it easier for you to concentrate on the tasks at hand.


5. Individual and Team Sports
Most sports require you to be highly aware of how your body and/or other objects (e.g. a ball, a bat, or a racket) move through space. This, in turn, helps improve your spatial awareness as well as mental rotations ability, which allows you to conceptualize how a certain shape or object looks when it’s flipped or rotated.
4. Cycling
In a study that was published in the Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research, people were asked to take memory, planning, and reasoning tests, ride a stationary bike for 30 minutes, then retake the tests. They had higher scores after they got on their stationary bikes, highlighting the improved brain performance that pedaling brings.
3. Swimming
One study has shown that toddlers who start swimming lessons earlier than their peers have more advanced motor skills and perform well in mathematical and oral communication tasks. Even adults can benefit from swimming; monitoring the pace clock, counting strokes and fly kicks, and making improvements to your breathing pattern can all sharpen your brain.
2. Sprinting
A study that was published in the Neurobiology of Learning and Memory showed that people who performed high-impact sprints learned vocabulary words at a 20 percent faster speed than when they performed low-impact running. This suggests that dopamine, epinephrine, and neurotrophic factor rise when you sprint and give your memory a boost.


1. Endurance Running
National Institutes of Health researchers studied people who ran for one hour 3 to 4 days a week and found that they had progressively better scores in thinking and memory tests as they improved their physical fitness. According to the researchers, the proteins produced by the stimulated muscles may have traveled to the subjects’ brain and improved its overall function. One of these proteins is Cathepsin B; scientists have discovered that those who have high levels of Cathepsin B also have better performance in memory and thinking tests.

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